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1826 to 1874

The Gentleman's Magazine and Historical Chronicle
1826

Page 265
Right of free chase and warren
Duke of Devonshire against Mr Lodge

Quote: "The plaintiff in this action, had been compelled to resort to a court of law in order to establish his rights to a species of property which had been for centuries possessed by himself and his ancestors, viz. The right of a free chace and warren in the Forest of Langstrothdale, in the county of York...."

The Mirror of Literature, Amusement and Instruction
1840 (Volume XXXV)

ORIGINAL ESSAYS;

Page 346
Quote: "The valley which now assumes the name of Langstrothdale, is not more than a quarter of a mile in width; and the mountains, which rise almost perpendicularly on either hand to a considerable altitude, are clothed with scanty herbage to their very summits...."

Rambles in Upper Wharfdale by B J Harker 1869
Historical and Traditional Lore
Pages 96 to 104

Quote: "Hubberholme is one of the oldest places in Upper Wharfedale; its church.... is nothing very beautiful in its architecture, it is an interesting object to those who have a liking for such venerable piles..... When it was first built this part of the country was forest; the inhabitants would live chiefly a Robin Hood type of life: Hunting the dappled deer...."

The Yorkshire Magazine Vol I
1871 to 1872

The Hills and Dales of Yorkshire - Upper Wharfedale
Page 305

Quote: "....but looking forward we have an almost uninterrupted view of the whole of Langstrothdale Chase, the real head of Wharfe. Yonder, fair opposite us, comes out Outershaw Beck, the little runlet of water which, with the tiny Green Field Beck at our feet, is destined to become the broad and deep Wharfe...."

MURRAY's HANDBOOK F0R TRAVELLERS IN YORKSHIRE
(Revised Edition)
1874

Route 31. Upper Wharfedale
page 428

Quote: "....The roodloft - painted with broad red lines - remains, with the date 1558.... There is a tradition of great flood here, which left many fish in this little church. - where the foresters of Langstrothdale have been baptized and buried at least ever since the conquest...."

 

1874 to 1900

The Huddersfield College Magazine Volume 3
1874 to 1875

III - Holiday Rambles, The Wharfe
Page 169

Quote: "The Wharfe has a longer course through fine scenery than any other Yorkshire river.... With Wharfedale I made my first acquaintance at that spot,—which has been called "the central spot in England for sweet native loveliness,"—where from a romantic glen, the river emerges into that "picturesque combination of cliff, meadow, forest, and monastic ruins."

Tourist's Guide to The West Riding of Yorksire by G Phillips Bevan, FGS
1877

Page 107
Quote: "Following the course of the Wharfe, lm. above Buckden is Kirkgill or Hubberholme, the church of Langstrothdale, which the pedestrian has now entered. St. Michael's Chapel, as it is called.... It is an interesting fact, that the dialect of this dale, in the very heart of the Yorkshire mountains, should agree more than any dialect in England with that which is to be found in Chaucer."

MURRAY's HANDBOOK F0R TRAVELLERS IN YORKSHIRE
1882 (Third Edition)

Route 31 - Page 402
Quote: "Langstrothdale or Langstrother (the name seems originally celtic - Strath hir, the 'long valley' and as in many similar cases, the teutonic translation of part of the name was added to it - Langstrother and Cornstrother occur in the 'Black Book of Hexham' among the boundaries of Carraw; and Comp...."

The Craven and North-West Yorkshire Highlands By H Speight
1892


Chapter XXXIII, At The Head of the Wharfe
Page 338

Quote: "In the winter 1885-6, when, owing to the accumulations of snow.... this old church is said to have been buried in the drifts midway up the windows. Many of the gullies and narrow passes in the neighbourhood were choked to a depth of thirty or forty feet, and several houses had literally to be " dug out." A very large number of sheep perished...."

UPPER WHARFEDALE by HARRY SPEIGHT
1900

ACCOUNT OF THE HISTORY, ANTIQUITIES AND SCENERY
Page 491

Quote: "Previous vicars had been obliged to content themselves with the best lodgment they could find in the village, but through the exertions of the present energetic vicar, the Rev. Richard F. R. Anderton, a house has been provided at last worthy of those entrusted with the cure of souls."

 

1900 to 1939

Higher Wharfeland: The Dale Of Romance by Edmund Bogg
1904

FROM ORMSCLIFFE TO CAM FELL. BEING A DESCRIPTION OK ITS PICTURESQUE FEATURES, HISTORY, ANTIQUITIES, RARE ARCHITECTURE, TRADITION, OLD WORLD STORY, AND ALSO ITS FLORA. A COMPANION VOLUME TO " LOWER WHARFELAND," ETC.

Two Thousand Miles in Wharfedale by Edmund Bogg
1904

A Descriptive Account of the History, Antiquities, Legendary Lore, Picturesque Features, and Rare Architecture of the Vale of the Wharfe, from Tadcaster to Cam Fell

The Blue Guides - England by Findley Muirhead, MA, FRGS 1923  Page 462 Upper Wharfedale Quote: "....to the left continues up the Wharfe valley, here called Langstrothdale. The dialect of this dale agrees more nearly than any other with Chaucerian English as used (e.g.) in the 'Reeve's Tale' ".

The Blue Guides - England by Findley Muirhead, MA, FRGS
1923

Page 462
Upper Wharfedale

Quote: "....to the left continues up the Wharfe valley, here called Langstrothdale. The dialect of this dale agrees more nearly than any other with Chaucerian English as used (e.g.) in the 'Reeve's Tale' We cross the river and hug its right bank. 1¼ m. Hubberholme, with a small and ancient church....".

The Striding Dales by Halliwell Sutcliffe
1929 (1939)

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